how much iodine in eggs

Eggs are a staple in many diets around the world. They are a versatile and affordable source of protein and other essential nutrients. One nutrient that eggs are particularly rich in is iodine.

Iodine is an essential mineral that the body needs to produce thyroid hormones.

These hormones are important for regulating metabolism and other bodily functions. Iodine deficiency can lead to a range of health problems, including goiter, hypothyroidism, and intellectual disabilities in children.

While iodine is found in a variety of foods, eggs are a particularly good source.

In fact, one large egg contains around 24 micrograms of iodine, which is about 16% of the daily recommended intake for adults.

However, the amount of iodine in eggs can vary depending on a number of factors, including the hen’s diet and the soil in which the feed was grown.

Iodine in Eggs

Eggs are a popular and versatile food that can be cooked in many ways.

They are also a good source of many essential nutrients, including iodine. In this section, we will explore how much iodine is in eggs and what factors affect their iodine content.

How Much Iodine is in Eggs?

According to several sources, one large egg contains an average of 24-26 micrograms (mcg) of iodine, which is about 16-17% of the recommended daily intake for adults.

This makes eggs a relatively good source of iodine, especially for people who do not consume iodized salt or other iodine-rich foods regularly.

It is worth noting that most of the iodine in eggs is found in the yolk, so people who only eat egg whites may not get as much iodine from their diet.

Additionally, the iodine content of eggs can vary depending on several factors, such as the chicken’s diet and the soil iodine levels in the area where the chicken was raised.

Factors Affecting Iodine Content in Eggs

Several factors can affect the iodine content of eggs, including:

  • The chicken’s diet: Iodine is an essential nutrient for chickens, and their diet can affect the iodine content of their eggs. For example, chickens that are fed a diet high in iodine-rich foods, such as seaweed or iodized salt, may lay eggs with higher iodine levels.
  • The soil iodine levels: The iodine content of the soil where the chicken was raised can also affect the iodine content of their eggs. For example, chickens raised in areas with iodine-deficient soil may lay eggs with lower iodine levels.
  • The egg’s size: The iodine content of an egg can vary depending on its size. For example, a jumbo egg may contain more iodine than a medium-sized egg.
  • The cooking method: Some cooking methods, such as boiling or poaching, may cause some of the iodine in the egg to leach out into the cooking water. However, the amount of iodine lost during cooking is likely to be small.

Overall, eggs are a good source of iodine, providing about 16-17% of the recommended daily intake per large egg. However, their iodine content can vary depending on several factors, such as the chicken’s diet and the soil iodine levels in the area where the chicken was raised.

What is Iodine?

Iodine is a mineral that is essential for human health. It is required for the production of thyroid hormones, which play a crucial role in regulating metabolism and many other bodily functions.

Iodine also helps to maintain healthy skin, teeth, and hair and is important for proper brain development and cognitive performance.

While iodine deficiency is rare in developed countries, it can still occur in certain populations, such as pregnant women, vegans, and people with thyroid disorders.

Symptoms of iodine deficiency can include fatigue, weight gain, and goiter (enlarged thyroid gland).

Most people get enough iodine from their diet, which typically includes iodized salt, seafood, dairy products, and eggs.

However, it is important to be aware of iodine intake, especially for those at risk of deficiency or those with thyroid disorders.

Why is Iodine Important?

Iodine is an essential mineral that plays a vital role in the body’s overall health. It is particularly important for thyroid function, which regulates metabolism, growth, and development.

Iodine is also essential for the production of thyroid hormones, which are required for the proper functioning of virtually every cell in the body.

Iodine Deficiency

Iodine deficiency is a significant public health issue worldwide, particularly in regions where soil and water are low in iodine. According to the World Health Organization, iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable intellectual disability in children.

Some of the most common symptoms of iodine deficiency include goiter, hypothyroidism, and mental retardation. In pregnant women, iodine deficiency can lead to stillbirth, miscarriage, and congenital abnormalities in the baby.

Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that you are getting enough iodine in your diet to prevent these health problems.

One way to ensure that you are getting enough iodine is to consume foods that are rich in this essential mineral. Eggs are an excellent source of iodine, with one large egg containing around 24 mcg of iodine.

Other Sources of Iodine

In addition to eggs, there are many other sources of iodine that can be included in a healthy diet. Some of the best sources of iodine include:

  • Seaweed, such as kelp, nori, kombu, and wakame
  • Fish and other seafood, such as tuna, shrimp, and cod
  • Dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt
  • Iodized salt

Seaweed is one of the best food sources of iodine. Just one gram of seaweed can contain up to 2,984 mcg of iodine. However, it is important to note that consuming too much seaweed can lead to excessive iodine intake, which can have negative health effects.

Fish and other seafood are also excellent sources of iodine. For example, three ounces of cooked shrimp contains about 35 mcg of iodine, while three ounces of cooked cod contains about 99 mcg of iodine.

Dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt, can also be good sources of iodine. For example, one cup of milk contains about 56 mcg of iodine, while one cup of plain Greek yogurt contains up to 116 mcg of iodine.

Iodized salt is another important source of iodine. In fact, iodized salt is the most common source of iodine in the American diet. Just one gram of iodized salt contains about 77 mcg of iodine.

It is important to note that the amount of iodine in food can vary depending on a number of factors, including the soil in which the food was grown and the feed given to animals.

Therefore, it is important to consume a variety of iodine-rich foods to ensure adequate intake of this essential nutrient.

Conclusion

Eggs are a great source of iodine, providing about 16% of the daily value per large egg. Iodine is important for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland, which regulates metabolism and growth.

A deficiency in iodine can lead to goiter, hypothyroidism, and intellectual disabilities in children born to iodine-deficient mothers.

While eggs are not the richest source of iodine, they are a convenient and affordable option for those looking to increase their iodine intake. Other good sources of iodine include seaweed, fish, and dairy products.

It is important to note that excessive iodine intake can also be harmful, so it is best to aim for the recommended daily intake of 150 micrograms for adults.

In conclusion, incorporating iodine-rich foods like eggs into a balanced diet can help ensure adequate iodine intake and support overall health. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before making any significant changes to one’s diet or supplement regimen.

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About the Author Adam


As a health and fitness writer, Adam combines his two passions—weightlifting and writing. With a creative writing degree under his belt, he spends his mornings lifting weights, his nights putting pen to paper, and eating too many snacks in between.

Health Disclaimer

  • Any products written about is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
  • Results may vary/may not be typical. 
  • This information does not constitute medical advice and it should not be relied upon as such. Consult with your doctor before modifying your regular medical regime.

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