how much iodine in tomatoes

When following a low iodine diet, it’s important to know which foods are safe to eat and which ones should be avoided. Tomatoes are a popular food item that many people wonder about when following this type of diet.

Tomatoes are generally considered safe to eat on a low iodine diet. According to the American Thyroid Association, fresh fruits and vegetables are generally low in iodine and can be consumed freely on this type of diet. This includes tomatoes, which are a good source of vitamins and minerals.

However, it’s important to note that not all tomato products are safe to consume on a low iodine diet. Canned tomatoes and tomato products may contain added iodine, so it’s important to check the label before consuming these items. It’s also important to avoid tomato products that contain iodized salt, as this can increase iodine intake.

Low Iodine Diet

What is a Low Iodine Diet?

A low iodine diet is a temporary diet that restricts the intake of iodine-rich foods.

Iodine is important for thyroid function, but when preparing for certain medical procedures, such as radioactive iodine therapy or an iodine scan, a low iodine diet may be prescribed to increase the effectiveness of the procedure.

Iodine can be found in varying amounts in many foods and beverages, so a low iodine diet requires careful planning and monitoring of food intake.

Why is a Low Iodine Diet Prescribed?

A low iodine diet is often prescribed before radioactive iodine therapy or an iodine scan. These procedures require the patient’s thyroid gland to be temporarily starved of iodine so that it can absorb the radioactive iodine more effectively. A low iodine diet can also be prescribed for people with thyroid cancer who have had their thyroid gland removed and are taking thyroid hormone replacement therapy. In this case, a low iodine diet can help improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests and scans.

It is important to follow a low iodine diet carefully and strictly, as consuming too much iodine can interfere with the effectiveness of the medical procedure or diagnostic test.

Tomatoes and a Low Iodine Diet

Can You Eat Tomatoes on a Low Iodine Diet?

Tomatoes are generally considered safe to eat on a low iodine diet. According to the American Thyroid Association, tomatoes are a low-iodine food that can be consumed freely. However, it’s important to note that some tomato-based products, such as canned tomatoes and tomato sauce, may contain added salt, which should be avoided on a low iodine diet. It’s best to check the labels of these products carefully before consuming them.

Iodine Content of Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a low-iodine food, meaning they contain very little iodine. According to the USDA, one medium-sized tomato contains only 3 micrograms of iodine. This makes tomatoes a safe and healthy choice for those following a low iodine diet.

In addition to being low in iodine, tomatoes are also a good source of vitamins A and C, as well as antioxidants. They can be enjoyed in a variety of ways, including raw in salads, roasted, grilled, or used in sauces and soups.

Overall, tomatoes are a safe and nutritious food to include in a low iodine diet. However, it’s important to be mindful of any added salt in tomato-based products and to check labels carefully.

Other Foods to Avoid

Foods High in Iodine

When following a low iodine diet, it’s important to avoid foods that are high in iodine. These include:

  • Seafood, including fish, shellfish, and seaweed
  • Dairy products, including milk, cheese, and yogurt
  • Eggs
  • Iodized salt
  • Some breads and cereals that contain iodate dough conditioners

Foods That May Contain Iodine

Some foods may contain iodine even if they are not high in iodine. These include:

  • Processed foods, such as canned soups and vegetables
  • Bakery products, such as bread, cakes, and cookies
  • Red food coloring (E127 or FD&C Red Dye #3)
  • Herbal supplements, such as kelp and bladderwrack
  • Vitamins and mineral supplements that contain iodine

It’s important to carefully read food labels and avoid any products that contain iodine or iodized salt. When in doubt, it’s best to avoid a food unless you know for sure that it is low in iodine.

By avoiding these foods, individuals can help ensure that their low iodine diet is effective in preparing for radioactive iodine therapy.

Conclusion

Overall, a low iodine diet can be a challenging but necessary part of preparing for radioactive iodine therapy. The diet requires avoiding iodized salt, dairy products, seafood, and other sources of iodine. However, there are still plenty of foods that can be enjoyed while on the diet, including fresh fruits and vegetables, unprocessed meats, and certain grains.

When it comes to tomatoes specifically, they can be included in a low iodine diet. According to the American Thyroid Association, tomatoes are considered a low iodine food and can be consumed in moderation. Other sources, such as Healthline, also confirm that tomatoes are safe to eat while on the diet.

It’s important to note that while tomatoes themselves are low iodine, certain tomato products may contain iodine. For example, canned tomatoes may contain added salt, which could be iodized. It’s always best to check the labels of any packaged or processed foods to ensure they are safe for a low iodine diet.

Overall, while a low iodine diet may require some adjustments and planning, it is possible to maintain a healthy and satisfying diet while on the regimen. By following the guidelines set forth by medical professionals and checking labels of packaged foods, individuals can safely consume a variety of foods, including tomatoes, while on a low iodine diet.

Health Disclaimer

  • Any products written about is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
  • Results may vary/may not be typical. 
  • This information does not constitute medical advice and it should not be relied upon as such. Consult with your doctor before modifying your regular medical regime.
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